Tagged with Copts

Christians, Mostly, Embracing Sisi

Christians, Mostly, Embracing Sisi

From my recent article in Egypt Source: Ultimately, the formation of a new government in Egypt should be about one word: Competency. But the current nature of politics substitutes another word entirely: Sisi. Local analysis revolves around the question of what the development means in terms of the defense minister’s anticipated candidacy for president, and … Continue reading

The Quest for Minority Rights in Egypt

The Quest for Minority Rights in Egypt

From my recent article on Egypt Source: Coptic Christians have reason to celebrate… alone. While they and many others rejoice at the removal of the overall Islamist tinge of the 2012 constitution, this largely liberal-produced draft leaves other religious minorities out in the cold. “One of the main concerns we have is that freedom of … Continue reading

Egypt, the Army, and the Early Christian Ethic of Life

Egypt, the Army, and the Early Christian Ethic of Life

From Christianity Today, an interview with Ron Sider, who compiled every early church writing on the subject of killing: It’s not just just-war theory versus pacifism. The book covers war, capital punishment, gladiatorial games, infanticide, abortion, and so forth. Did the early Christian writers tie those together, or did they treat them as separate ethical … Continue reading

Surveying Foreign Christian Residents in Egypt on the Interpretation of Political Events

Surveying Foreign Christian Residents in Egypt on the Interpretation of Political Events

In Egypt’s current political struggle both sides are using the media to highlight their interpretation of events. State media is accused of turning the nation against the democratically elected president and his backers in the Muslim Brotherhood. Meanwhile, anti-Islamists target Western media in particular of having a bias toward the Brotherhood, against the military, and … Continue reading

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Wedding Terror

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Wedding Terror

God, Of the troubles that Copts face, this may portend the worst. A wedding celebration in a working-class Cairo neighborhood church suffered a drive-by shooting. Five died, including two children and the mother of the groom. Church buildings have been attacked. Land disputes may be disguised criminal aggression. But rarely has anyone shot to kill. … Continue reading

More Brotherhood Doublespeak

From the Atlantic Council, following the Muslim Brotherhood’s English and Arabic discourse on Dalga, an Upper Egyptian village seized by Islamists and recently recovered by the security forces: The Muslim Brotherhood has been quick to roll the Dalga raid into an on-going crackdown on the organization and its supporters, but has once again offered different … Continue reading

Copts Unite with Muslims after Islamist Attacks

From Egyptian Streets, elaborating on how Bishop Thomas defended his church in Upper Egypt, which I briefly mentioned in this report: “We learned that extremists were going to attack us with machine guns, but we did not prepare ourselves for the attack with weapons. We did something simple,” says Bishop Thomas, about that day he … Continue reading

In South Egypt, Islamists Take Over a Town

Here in Maadi, Cairo, life goes on as normal amid the political instability. This town in Minya is not so fortunate. From the AP: A town of some 120,000 — including 20,000 Christians — Dalga has been outside government control since hard-line supporters of the Islamist Mohammed Morsi drove out police and occupied their station … Continue reading

Making Sense of Egypt’s Popular ‘Coup’

Making Sense of Egypt’s Popular ‘Coup’

From my recent article at Christian Century. It walks through the transition which brought Morsi to power and thereafter deposed him. Here is an excerpt from the conclusion, focusing on the position of Christians: As for the nation’s Christians, they view the military intervention as salvation. Coptic Orthodox Pope Tawadros, who had pledged upon his … Continue reading

Egyptian Christians Killed After President’s Ouster

Egyptian Christians Killed After President’s Ouster

From my article in Christianity Today, published July 9, describing both Christians and Muslims killed in a worrisome escalation of violence. But this excerpt concerns another matter for Christians in particular: Should they have joined the revolt in the first place, on Biblical grounds? Bishop Mouneer also called the [military] action an answer to prayer, … Continue reading

Who Should Christians Support in Egypt?

Who Should Christians Support in Egypt?

From my recent article in Relevant Magazine: When push comes to shove, as it has in Egypt, who should American Christians support? The recent military move to oust an elected president was almost universally backed by Egyptian Coptic Christians, which make up roughly ten percent of the population. But the move, called by many a … Continue reading

John Stott and the Power of a Tweet

John Stott and the Power of a Tweet

From a recent blog post by the charity Coptic Orphans: John Stott was an Anglican writer and student of the Scriptures. Christianity Today reprinted a sermon he gave on “Four Ways Christians can influence the world.” Then, someone asked on Twitter, and @Copticorphans retweeted: “How does this apply to Copts in Egypt?” How can Copts … Continue reading

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Easter Greetings

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Easter Greetings

God, There is much that Egyptian Muslims and Christians agree upon, much which unites the two and allows them to pray similarly. But at one point the religions are rather irreconcilable: Jesus was not crucified, and therefore was not resurrected. There is no Easter, celebrated by Copts this coming Sunday. Fair enough. There are plenty … Continue reading

Is Coptic Evangelism in Africa Really on the Rise?

Is Coptic Evangelism in Africa Really on the Rise?

From my latest article on Christianity Today, published March 28, 2013: Many Egyptian Christians wear their faith on their sleeve—literally. The cross tattooed on the wrist of Coptic Orthodox believers is a public display which marks their identity for all to see. Such a quiet witness usually avoids reproach. But recently in Libya, radical Muslim … Continue reading