Tagged with Maadi

Where Credit is Due

Where Credit is Due

Two years ago I wrote about Egypt and her struggle to return to normal. Protests were still being waged on the streets, as terrorism assaulted the post-Morsi regime. But that article featured also the mundane. A foot bridge was repaired by local authorities in the Maadi neighborhood of Cairo, but for a long time left … Continue reading

The Pope, in Maadi

The Pope, in Maadi

Friends in Philadelphia will soon have the privilege of a papal visit. But will Pope Francis preach in your particular church? His equal in the faith visited us in Maadi. A Catholic might not consider it so. A Protestant might insist we are all equal. But for Orthodox Christians, Pope Tawadros is patriarch of one … Continue reading

Convergence

Convergence

A few days ago I stood in the center of a crowded metro car. It was around 95 degrees, hotter inside. Strangely enough with the open windows and rotating ceiling fans, the temperature was tolerable. Sometimes it can be preferable in the aisle, rather than squeezed five across a four person bench. But generally it … Continue reading

A Color (Printed) Revolution?

A Color (Printed) Revolution?

With decent regularity pro-Morsi supporters have conducted small protest marches around our Maadi neighborhood since his removal from office in July 2013. They do not tend to be violent but usually result in ugly graffiti insulting now-President Sisi. Recently, new graffiti has emerged, calling the people to ‘man up’ and protest on January 25, the … Continue reading

Yalla Maadi Clean-Up Day

Yalla Maadi Clean-Up Day

Following the success of the January 25, 2011 revolution, Egypt witnessed a great wave of civic activism. One of the most popular manifestations was in campaigns to clean the city streets, often accompanied by vibrant artwork and pro-Egypt graffiti. But as the enthusiasm waned and the political situation became more and more polarized, citizens went … Continue reading

Unintended Recipients of Generosity

Unintended Recipients of Generosity

‘Make sure your kids come to Sunday School tomorrow,’ their teacher told Julie. Snug in bed, my wife ignored her first call at 10:45pm, but then picked up on her second effort at 11:00. Egyptians are well known as night owls, though they don’t usually call us so late. ‘There will be special visitors,’ she … Continue reading

Our Little Ones Watch a Protest

Our Little Ones Watch a Protest

The other day Emma’s best friend, Karoleen, and her younger brother, Boula, came over to play at our home following church. As the kids were gathered around the table working on crafts, I heard the familiar sounds of a protest approaching. A fair number have passed near the house in recent months, although they usually … Continue reading

Changes in the Neighborhood

Changes in the Neighborhood

We spent a good part of this past summer in the United States, far away from the explosive political situation. As we prepared to return, nearly everyone asked a similar question: Is it safe? It was a fair question. Hundreds of supporters of the deposed president were killed while security dispersed their sit-in. Dozens of … Continue reading

A Family Errand through Tahrir

A Family Errand through Tahrir

My life in Cairo is spent mostly in our house and the surrounding area of Maadi, which is about half an hour from the famous Tahrir Square.  Friends and family in the states get nervous when they see the violence and flare-ups in Egypt, but the reality for me is generally far removed.  Last week, … Continue reading

Photos from the Aftermath of Tahrir Clashes

Photos from the Aftermath of Tahrir Clashes

Egypt has just witnessed some of the fiercest clashes in the revolutionary era, as many protestors appear radicalized. There are still peaceful demonstrations, to be sure, but even these appear to be violently resisted by police. It is hard to blame the police, though, as the lines are blurred. I missed out on the latest … Continue reading

Little Pink Chicks

Little Pink Chicks

We had not noticed it in years past, somehow, but apparently it is the season for pink chicks in Egypt. Really, they are hard to miss. Mixed among the cutlery, shoes, and fruit offered by illegal street vendors up and down the road leading to the local Maadi metro station are tiny little chicks crowded … Continue reading

On Expat Life and a Sense of Belonging

A little while ago the expat facilitation site InterNations featured our blog to help their readers adjust in advance to life in Cairo. Please click on the link to see their article for yourself, but here is the content. It describes a little of our philosophy in living overseas. 1.      Please tell us a little … Continue reading

A Salafi Speaks in Church on Shenouda

The evening was supposed to be about Fatima Naout and Pope Shenouda. It turned out to be so much more. That it included Fatima Naout is semi-exceptional in itself. St. Mark’s  Coptic Orthodox Church in Maadi invited her to be the keynote presenter for a memorial service for Pope Shenouda. Naout is a Muslim. Yet … Continue reading

CNN in Cairo: Ben Wedeman

It is not an Arab Spring, says Ben Wedeman, CNN’s Senior Correspondent in Cairo, as it has lasted through several seasons, and is likely to continue several more. He prefers the term Arab Revolt, and believes there is no going back. Wedeman spoke at the Abraham Forum hosted by St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church … Continue reading

Understanding Egypt’s Elections

Egypt’s first free elections in over thirty years did not err on the side of simplicity. Even so, this did not deter massive national participation and excitement, as 54% of the nation lined up for hours on the street to cast their ballot. Many, however, admitted to having little knowledge about the political process, enabling … Continue reading

Living in Fear

“I haven’t gone out in over a year.” This was one of the statements my friend said to me the other day in talking about the changes in Egypt recently, particularly the lack of safety. “I used to go out with my sister-in-law.  I would leave the kids at my mother-in-law’s house, and my sister … Continue reading

Christmas with the Brotherhood

Following two years of bloody winter holidays, and following also resounding Islamic success in elections, the Muslim Brotherhood coordinated with security forces – and probably Orthodox Church leadership – to stand watch outside church buildings throughout Egypt. I was able to visit one installation in Helwan, to the south of Cairo. After moving from church … Continue reading

Disappointment with the Brotherhood

The morning of elections, I marveled at the political acumen of the Muslim Brotherhood. By afternoon, I was disappointed. At polling stations across Egypt the Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party volunteers manned tables equipped with laptop computers and logged into the voter registration system to assist confused citizens where their vote must be cast. The … Continue reading