Tagged with Mohamed Morsi

Safwat Hegazi, Body Double?

Safwat Hegazi, Body Double?

In late August and early September I published an article and two other posts about Safwat Hegazi, one of the more controversial Islamist supporters of Mohamed Morsi. The article collected links and information about his often inflammatory speeches and public statements, calling him a Bellwether of Egyptian Islamism. The second linked to a full article … Continue reading

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Constitution Open

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Constitution Open

God, Egypt has taken its first concrete step forward since President Morsi was removed. By completing the draft constitution, set for a referendum in January, the roadmap for rebuilding democracy is underway. But it is ill-defined. The constitution leaves open the order of elections, if parliamentary or presidential will occur first. It also does not … Continue reading

Cairo’s Christian Garbagemen Back to Work

From the Guardian, describing a reversal in state policy to work with those who do the job best: In 2012 former president Mohamed Morsi had made the state of the streets an electoral issue, claiming that he would clean them up in 100 days. He failed. “There’s only one solution,” said Greiss, “and that is … Continue reading

Our Little Ones Watch a Protest

Our Little Ones Watch a Protest

The other day Emma’s best friend, Karoleen, and her younger brother, Boula, came over to play at our home following church. As the kids were gathered around the table working on crafts, I heard the familiar sounds of a protest approaching. A fair number have passed near the house in recent months, although they usually … Continue reading

Amr Darrag on the Brotherhood’s Mistakes, Sort of

Amr Darrag on the Brotherhood’s Mistakes, Sort of

From my recent article at Egypt Source: During the lead-up to the June 30 protests demanding early elections through the violent dispersal of the pro-Morsi sit-ins, several Brotherhood members spoke in vague terms of their ‘mistakes.’ It was a conciliatory gesture of sorts, admitting Morsi’s less than stellar performance but arguing this was not enough … Continue reading

The Shape of ‘Terrorism’ Outside Cairo

Following on the heels of Morsi’s trial, it is difficult to see how the Muslim Brotherhood is called a terrorist organization from within the urban settings of Cairo. But this article from the Daily Beast describes the embattled position of police elsewhere: “We never imagined that the violence could reach this point,” said Qadry Said … Continue reading

Kerry’s Visit, as Reported in Cairo and Washington

First from Ahram Online, in very negative tones: US Secretary of State John Kerry met with top Egypt officials to convey Washington’s “deep concern” about the transitional period and to offer the US’s goodwill should developments move “on the right track,” according to Western diplomats. But on CNN, the focus brushes over any difficulties at … Continue reading

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Trial, Satire

Friday Prayers for Egypt: Trial, Satire

God, Egypt’s tests continue. Popular talk show satirist Bassem Youssef returned to the air after a long absence and subsequently lost a lot of his popularity. Praised and hated for poking fun at President Morsi and fellow Islamists, he turned his attention to the adoration mania surrounding military leader General Sisi. Not only did many … Continue reading

Surveying Foreign Christian Residents in Egypt on the Interpretation of Political Events

Surveying Foreign Christian Residents in Egypt on the Interpretation of Political Events

In Egypt’s current political struggle both sides are using the media to highlight their interpretation of events. State media is accused of turning the nation against the democratically elected president and his backers in the Muslim Brotherhood. Meanwhile, anti-Islamists target Western media in particular of having a bias toward the Brotherhood, against the military, and … Continue reading

An Unfortunate Song with a Catchy Tune

An Unfortunate Song with a Catchy Tune

This popular Egyptian song by Ali al-Haggar is titled ‘We are a People’. It was created around the time of the military action to remove President Morsi from power, showing scenes from the protests against him. Fair enough, but the lyrics do not stop at the title. The refrain continues ‘… and you are a … Continue reading

Another Coup, A Salafi Hope

Another Coup, A Salafi Hope

From my recent article in Egypt Source: In order to reverse a coup d’état, Egypt needs a coup d’état. This, in brief, is the solution to Egypt’s crisis offered by Hani Fawzi, general secretary of the Cairo-based Salafi Asala Party. It must be prompted, however, by massive protests. No longer simply the domain of the … Continue reading

What Path will Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood Choose?

Three options are presented in an excellent and thorough analysis from the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. I will excerpt the conclusions for each, but the whole article is worth reading. If you would like to skip over the quotations for my brief commentary, please scroll down to the end. First, on the possibility of … Continue reading

Worrisome Indications of Egypt’s Future

Most people I have interacted with since our return to Cairo are very positive about the nation’s future. They are glad to see Morsi go, the Brotherhood discredited, and though they anticipate a few hiccups from disgruntled Islamists, they expect a return to stability and normalcy within a few months. Here are two voices which … Continue reading

Obama at the UN: As Seen by an Egyptian

Obama at the UN: As Seen by an Egyptian

Many Egyptians believe the United States is deeply involved in their nation’s affairs. Some believe because of strong military ties, President Obama was behind the removal of President Morsi. Others believe because of a State Department search for a new reliable partner to do their bidding, President Obama was behind the ascent of the Muslim … Continue reading